Know some do’s and don’ts when giving first aid

One of the most frequently reported events worldwide, snakebite has been recognized as the highest priority neglected tropical disease by the World Health Organization (WHO).

Representative image. AFP

One of the most frequently reported events worldwide, snakebite has been recognized as the highest priority neglected tropical disease by the World Health Organization (WHO). According to the WHO, millions of people are bitten by snakes each year around the world and about 1 to 1.5 million people also die from them. While some of the snakes are non-venomous, some of them are highly venomous and their venom can cause immediate or slow death. Notably, snakebite cases are mostly reported in forest regions and poor rural areas in parts of Asia, Africa, Latin America, as well as Oceania. However, it is also one of the most neglected topics in global health.

Talking about the impact of snake bites, usually if bitten by a venomous snake, it can lead to various medical emergencies including shock, paralysis, hemorrhage, kidney damage and tissue destruction which can then develop. turn out to be fatal or result in permanent disability if left untreated. . Most deaths and serious consequences of snakebites are usually due to untimely access to safe and effective treatment and also lack of awareness among people regarding first aid for patients.

Read on for some of the do’s and don’ts for snakebite patients. While if it is non-venomous, a snakebite can be considered a puncture wound and treated accordingly, however, for poisonous snakebites, certain measures must be taken to prevent the disease from getting worse.

Backs of Snake Bites:

Immediately call an ambulance as the patient needs to be rushed for prompt medical treatment.
If there is a delay, consider finding an alternative to move the patient to the hospital.
Immobilize the patient and remove any type of implement from the bite area to prevent rapid spread of venom.
Try to keep the patient awake and calm.
Clean the wound with soap and water and cover it with a clean, dry dressing.
Try taking a picture of the snake to help understand the treatment.

Not to do

Try not to panic as this may upset the patient.
Never cut a bite.
Don’t try to suck the venom out.
Consider applying ice or water to the wound.
Never treat the wound yourself as this can deteriorate the condition.

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About Antoine L. Cassell

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